Shipwrecks
Near the Cranberry Isles
Recorded by William Preble


These reports are recorded in a handwritten journal by William P. Preble.

Vessel, tons Master
Mate
Date
Schooner JESSIE, 60
Londonderry, Nova Scotia
George E. Slack
Daniel Faulkner
6 Jan 1867
Schooner C.D. HORTON, 107
Parrsboro, Nova Scotia
William Smith
Alfred Bennet
17 Jan 1867
Schooner ALICE T, 124
St. Johns, New Brunswick
William Clark
Samuel Price
17 Jan 1867
Schooner PILOT, 44/100
Mt. Desert, Maine
Thomas H. Smallidge
Elisha Y. Young
23 Oct 1867
Brigantine CHARLOTTE, 160 British
St. Johns, New Brunswick
Benjamin T. Carter
Alfred Bennett
4 Nov 1867
C.E. HOWARD, 12 tons
Cranberry Isles, Maine
Lewis H. Bracy
Benjamin Spurling
22 Jun 1868
Schooner AMARANTH, 99
Digby, Nova Scotia
George McNealy
Richard Armstrong
25 Oct 1868
Brigantine AEROLITE, 150 Brit.
St. Johns, New Brunswick
Alexander Thomas
John Kenneday
12 Jan 1869
Brigantine EDWARD DELISLE, 170 Br.
Basterre, St. Christophers Island, B.W.I.
Manning Lent
Joseph McNeil
21 Apr 1869
Schooner ROSILLA B, 107 British
St. Johns, New Brunswick
William Lipsett
William Heater
(or Heates)
9 Feb 1871
Schooner WILLIAM HONE, 99
Staten Island, New York
Samuel Cole
Andrew Small
8 Dec 1872
Schooner G.F. BAIRD, 94
St. Johns, New Brunswick
James B. Head
Albert Landon
1 Dec 1874
Schooner HENRY BUSHMAN, ??
Parrsboro, Nova Scotia
James Greene
??
6 Dec 1874
Brigantine THREE CHEERS, ??
Halifax, Nova Scotia
Burnard McConnell
??
13 Apr 1875
Schooner OLIVE CLARK, ??
Eastport, Maine
James E. Davis
Elijah M. West
17 Mar 1876
Schooner REDONDO, 98
Ellsworth, Maine
Alonzo Young
Abijah Curtis
26 Apr 1876
Schooner SUNBEAM, 118
Calais, Maine
Henry S. Bunker
Joseph Willard Bunker
28 Jun 1876
Schooner BAKER, 47
Rocklamd, Maine
Joseph Bunker
Robert Stanwood
5 Nov 1878
Schooner LYRA, 62
Windsor, Nova Scotia
Charles Bishop
Thomas Thomas
2 Dec 1878
Schooner PRESTO, ??
Machias, Maine
Luther Colbeth
??
4 Nov 1878




PROTEST OF CAPT GEORGE E SLACK
MASTER OF THE SCHR JESSIE OF LONDONDERRY NOVA SCOTIA


By this Public Instrument of Protest made & Entered this 7th. day of January A.D. 1867 be it known that on the 6th. day of January came and appeared before me at Cranberry Isles County of Hancock & State of Maine William P Preble a Notary of Public Personally come and appeared George E Slack Master of the ship or vessel called the Jessie of the burthen of sixty Tons or thereabouts belonging to the Port of Londonderry in the Province of Nova Scotia and Daniel Faulkner first mate of the said ship or vessel who severally declared that the said ship or vessel being laden with Potatoes on the 26th. day A D 1866 last past at 3 OClock in the afternoon they the said appearers set sail on board of the said ship or vessel from St Johns New Brunswick and bound directly to the Port of Boston in the United States of America & State of Massachusetts and that the said ship or vessel in the prosecution of her said voyage on the Evening of the second day of January A.D. 1867 at 8 OClock anchored in Cranberry Island harbor with the wind at N N East light and baffling with the appearances of a Snow Storm and on the third day of Jan the wind at N N West the weather still looking unfavorable to proceed to Sea and on the fourth day of Jan wind N West to Westerly still lay at anchor and on the fifth the wind at N N East with the appearances of a Snow Storm at 10 Oclock the wind canted more to the Eastward and snow spits at 5 Oclock it commenced snowing at 9 OClock in the Evening the Snow Storm increasing and the wind blowing fresh from the East north east the storm continuing to increase until about 11 0 Clock we overhauled a range of Cable and in a few minutes let go our second anchor and paid away our Cable so that both anchors took the strain the gale still increasing with the snow very thick and a piercing cold storm with a watch at the lookout at about one 0 Clock in the morning we found our anchors had started and we were Kedging to Leeward the weather continuing thick and blowing a perfect gale of wind and almost impossable to look to windward the vessel still drifting at half past one we could discern the trees on the shore astern and in a few minutes we discovered a perfect sheet of Breakers and in fifteen minutes we went into the Breakers stern first with about all our chain out the vessel struck aft on the Rocks and swung round broad side on the shore thumping heavily it being ebb tide we hoisted the jib to steady the vessel and heal (sic) her on and after she got still hauled it down and on the flood tide she pounded very heavily and commenced leaking badly and as the tide flowed the vessel ranged ahead and beat up on the rocks which proved to be Manchesters point so called and at day light commenced making preparations for the Safety of our lives to leave the vessel and if possible to obtain help to save what we could from the wreck the Storm continuing and blowing a violent gale at about 8 O Clock in the morning of the sixth of January we succeeded in getting our Boat off deck into the water on the Leeward side of the vessel having stopped up the sails we then left the vessel and rowed before the wind into the Pool and landed safely at Capt Stanleys wharf I then procured help as soon as possible one of my men being badly lamed and almost perished from cold and Exposure the Wreck Master and crew went on board and found one chain was gone and that she had beat over the point and lay with a large rock on the Larboard side soon a large sea hove her over the rock and took the chain end for end she hung aft and paid off before the wind and her rudder being gone we could not get control of the vessel we hoisted both jibs and a piece of the mainsail the appearers and Ships company used their utmost endeavors to preserve the said ship and the goods of her lading from damage and therefore the said George E Slack did declare and Protest as by these presents he does solemnly Protest against all and every person or persons whom it shall or may concern and does declare that all damages losses and detriments that have happened to the said ship or vessel and the goods of her loading (sic) are and ought to be borne by the merchants and freighters interested or whomsoever else it shall or may concern the same having occurred as before mentioned and not by or through the insufficiency of the said ship or neglect of the said appearers his officers or any of his mariners

Signed George E Slack Master
Daniel Faulkner Mate

Hancock S S

George E Slack Master and Daniel Faulkner Mate of the Schooner or vessel called the Jessie being severally duly sworn do severally make Oath & Say that the Instrument of Protest hereunto annexed has been clearly and distinctly read over to them these deponents and that the several matters and things therein contained are right and true in all respects as the same are therein particularly alleged declared and set forth

Sworn to before me at Cranberry
Isles the 7th. day of January
A.D. 1867
William P Preble Notary of Public

Cranberry Isles Jan 7th. 1867 by request and at the Instance of Capt George E Slack of the Schr. Jessie of Londonderry now ashore on the Rocks on Great Cranberry Island and in an Exposed situation with part of a cargo of Potatoes on board you Enoch B Stanley Ship Carpenter & John Stanley and Joseph Harding Shipmasters being appointed as a general survey on vessel

-----

Hancock SS we whose names are hereonto subscribed have this 6th day of January A.D. 1867 at the instance & request of George E Slack Master of the Schr. called the Jessie of Londonderry N Scotia bound on a voyage from St Johns N B to Boston in the U S & State of Massachusetts partly laden with Potatoes duly and carefully surveyed the Cargo and found the Potatoes wet and having floated fore and aft in the vessels hold after carefully examining the whole cargo we find the same so much damaged and perished as not by any means fit to be reshipped & order an immediate sale for the benefit of all the parties interested We also went on board and alongside the said Schr. Jessie of the berthen of 60 Tons or thereabouts to examine the said schooner and all the appendages to her belonging and having carefully and particularly inspected examined & surveyed the said Schr. Jessie and her appendages do report that the said vessels hull or (sic) are unfit to proceed to Sea we find her rudder gone her keel mostly beat out & on the starboard side we find her plank badly chafed and laying hard on a rock which we could not tell if it had gone through or not but on the Larboard side we find her badly chafed and bilged and without cables or anchors having previously been ashore on another point and beat over and now laying in a dangerous situation and recommend and order a speedy sale of said Schooner and her appendages for the benefit of all whom it does or may concern all of which we are ready to testify on our oaths when thereto required

witness our hands at Cranberry Isles the 6th day of January A.D. 1867

Joseph Harding Shipmaster
John Stanley Do
Enoch B Stanley Shipwright

Sworn to before me the Subscriber at Cranberry Isles the 6th day of Jan A.D. 1867
William P Preble Notary Public



To Joseph Bunker 2nd. & Henry S Bunker shipmasters and Wm. G Bunker Shipwright all residents of the Town of Cranberry Isles in the County of Hancock & State of Maine at the instance and request of William Smith master of the Schr or vessel called the C.D. Horton of Parrsboro Nova Scotia & bound from the Port of St Johns New Brunswick and to the Port of Matanzas in the Island of Cuba having dragged her anchors ashore in the terrible gale of the 17th. Inst. on Manchesters Point so called as a survey on said vessel and Cargo you are hereby required to go on board and alongside of the said schooner and particularly Examine the said vessel and Cargo and make your report under oath Accordingly

Dated at Cranberry Isles
Jan 18th. A D 1867
William P Preble Notary Public

PROTEST OF CAPT. WILLIAM SMITH
OF THE SCHR. C.D. HORTON OF PARRSBORO NOVA SCOTIA


By this Public Instrument of Protest made and entered this 18th day of January 1867 by William Smith Master of the Schr. C.D. Horton before me William P Preble a Notary Public at Cranberry Isles personally appeared William Smith master of the said ship or vessel called the C.D. Horton of burthen One hundred & seven tons or thereabouts belonging to the Port of Parrsboro N.S. and Alfred Bennett first Mate of the said ship or vessel being laden with Shipping boards Shugar Box Shooks (sic) that on the 14th day of January last past they the said appearers set sail on board of the said ship from the Port of St Johns in the Province of New Brunswick and bound to the Port of Matanzas on the Island of Cuba at 8 0 Clock A.M. with the wind from N N west we sailed along the coast until Tuesday the 15th day of January Inst the weather looking bad and all the appearances of a storm we came into Cranberry Island Harbor and came to anchor and furled our sails at 12 0 Clock at noon where we laid until 12 0 Clock at noon of the 16th Inst with the wind at N. West we got under way and proceeded to Sea at 9 0 Clock in the Evening the wind all died away and we lay becalmed until 11 0 Clock the wind sprung up from the South with baffling heirs (sic) it then commenced to thicken up with all the appearances of a Storm not liking the appearances of the weather we bore up for Cranberry Island Harbor at One 0 Clock at night the wind shifted to the S S East and commenced blowing a good breeze we continued our course for Cranberry Island Harbor at 4 0 Clock in the morning of the 17th the wind canted East and commenced to snow at half past 4 0 Clock we came to anchor in the Cranberry Island Harbor and furled our sails it was then a thick snow storm and blowing fresh with all the appearances of a gale of wind at 9 0 Clock in the forenoon of the 17th inst the wind canted to the East N East blowing a perfect gale the snow very thick and the vessel icing up badly the gale increasing at 2 0 Clock in the afternoon we let go our second anchor and paid out all the chain on both anchors at half past 2 0 Clock we found the vessel was dragging her anchors the wind still increasing until it blew a perfect Hurricane the vessel still dragging her anchors until half past 4 0 Clock in the afternoon we struck stern first on the rocks for the safety of our lives we then slipped our sheet chain to let her bows swing onto the shore the vessel so badly iced up that it was almost impossible to get fore and aft we found she was filling with water and in thirty minutes after she struck and thumping very heavily and the Sea making a breach over her half mast high we cut our boat from the davits and succeeded in getting her under the lee of the vessel we then jumped into the boat and succeeded in saving our lives wet and almost perished with cold and boat Stove saving nothing but what we had on Except the Chronometer in a damaged State it snowing and blowing and the snow driving in perfect sheets we could not see any distance and impossible to look to windward we started for some shelter and found we was on a point and wandered round and round until we found a fish house there we found an old pitch pot and we succeeded in getting a fire in that the Mate had strayed away from us and the steward was also missing in about half an hour the Steward found us by the light of the fire and when he came he was almost perished and could have stood the cold but a few minutes longer the Mate succeeded in finding a house and gave the alarm from which we soon found friends and was conducted to comfortable quarters where they done all they could for our relief

And the said appearers did further severally declare that the said ship at the time of her departure from St Johns aforesaid upon the said intended voyage was tight staunch and strong and had her hatches well and sufficiently caulked and covered and was well and sufficiently manned provided and furnished with all things needful and necessary for the said voyage and that during the said voyage the appearers and ships company used their utmost endeavers to preserve the said ship and the goods of her lading are and ought to be borne by the merchants and freighters interested or whomsoever else it shall or may concern the same having occurred as before mentioned and not by or through the insufficiency of the said ship or neglect of the said appearers his officers or any of his mariners

Signed William Smith Master
Alfred Bennet Mate

Hancock S S

Personally appeared William Smith Master and Alfred Bennett Mate of the Schooner or vessel called the C D Horton being severally & duly Sworn do severally make oath and say that the instrument of Protest hereunto annexed has been clearly and distinctly read over to them these deponents and that the several matters therein contained are right and true in all respects as the same are therein particularly alleged declared and set forth before me

William P Preble a Notary of Public at Cranberry Isles 19th day of January A.D. 1867

Cranberry Isles Jan 18th. 1867

We the undersigned having been appointed on a survey of the British Schr. C D Horton of Parsboro Nova Scotia all residents of Cranberry Isles in the County of Hancock & State of Maine deposeth and say and hereby jointly and severally declare and attest to all whom it may concern that on the 18th. day of January A D 1867 at the instance and request of William Smith Master of the Schr. or vessel called the C D Horton of Parrsboro Nova Scotia hereby certify that we went on board and alongside of the said Schr. and found her on the Rocks her bottom badly chafed and bilged with the Sea Flowing in and out of her laying in a dangerous situation with one cable and anchor gone and the other cable parted from the appearances as she lay on the chain we could not decide and she was liable to go to pieces and also if she floated to go to Sea and after due Examination of vessel and cargo for the benefit of whom it does or may concern as the weather looking very bad and still blowing a gale of wind and the vessel and riggin completely covered with Ice and very cold

In testimony whereof we hereby subscribe our names at Cranberry Isles this 18th. day of Jan A.D. 1867 on our Oaths

Joseph Bunker 2nd. Ship Master
Henry L Bunker Do
William G Bunker Shipwright

Signed and Sworn to before me William P Preble Notary Public



PROTEST OF CAPT WM. CLARK OF THE BRITISH SCHR ALICE T OF ST JOHNS N B ENTERED JAN 18TH. 1867

By this Public Instrument of Protest of William Clark Master of the Schr. Alice T that on the 18th. day of January 1867 before me William P Preble a Notary of Public duly commissioned personally appeared and come before me William Clark master of the ship or vessel called the Alice T of the burthen of One hundred & twenty four tons or thereabouts belonging to the Port of St Johns N. Brunswick and Samuel Price 1st mate of the said Ship who severally declared that the said ship or vessel being laden with lumber on the 15th. day of Jan Inst they the said appearers set sail on board the said ship from St Johns in the Province of New Brunswick bound directly to Portland in the State of Maine U.S.A. and that the said ship in the prosecution of her said voyage on the 17th. day of Jan at 2 0 Clock in the morning we we (sic) arrived at Cranberry Island Harbor and come to anchor and furled our sails with the wind a breezing up from the Eastward and snow spits with all appearances of a severe gale of wind and at half past 4 0 Clock A M it shut down thick of snow wind continuing at the east and blowing fresh at about nine 0 Clock in the forenoon of the 17th. the wind checked to the East N East blowing a perfect gale I let go our Second Anchor and paid out all the chain the vessel riding very heavy and blowing a perfect hurricane with the snow so thick that it was impossible to look to windward and the vessel a perfect sheet of Ice I found at half past 4 0 Clock P M the vessel was dragging her anchors at 10 minutes past 7 0 Clock P M of the 17 Inst we parted both chains and in five minutes we were on on (sic) the rocks broadside on the point of Rocks called long point the sea making a fair breach over the vessel and cold enough to freeze any human being it was impossible to get our boat from the davits we had to stay on board until One 0 Clock in the morning of the 18th. we succeeded in getting ashore almost perished the vessel filled soon after we drove ashore as high as the water could flow in her

And the said appearers did further severally declare that the said ship at the time of her departure from St Johns aforesaid upon the said intended voyage was tight staunch and strong and had her hatches well and sufficiently caulked and covered and was well and Sufficiently manned provided and furnished with all things needful and necessary for the said intended voyage and that during the said voyage the appearers and ships company used their utmost endeavors to preserve the said ship and the goods of her loading from damage and therefore the said William Clark did declare and protest as by these presents he does Solemnly protest against all and every person or persons whom it shall or may concern and does declare that all damages losses and detriments that have happened to the said ship and the goods of her loading are and ought to be borne by the merchants and Freighters interested or whomsoever else it shall or may concern the same the same (sic) having occured as before mentioned and not by or through the insufficiency of the said ship or neglect of the said appearers his officers or any of his mariners

All of which acts are hereby duly declared and set forth Signed William Clark Master
Samuel Price Mate
Hancock S S Personally appeared William Clark Master and Samuel Price first Mate of the Schr. or vessel called the Alice T being severally duly sworn do severally make Oath and say that the instrument of Protest hereunto annexed has been clearly and distinctly read over to them these deponents and that the several matters and things therein contained are right and true in all respects as the same are therein particularly alleged declared and set forth

Sworn to before me William P Preble a Notary of Public at Cranberry the 21st. day of January 1867

To Moses L. Bunker & Warren R Bunker Shipmasters & Abraham C Stanley Shipwrights all residents of Cranberry Isles in the County of Hancock and State of Maine at the request and instance of William Clark Master of the Ship or vessel called the Alice T of St Johns N. Brunswick bound from the port of St Johns to the Port of Portland in the United States having dragged her anchors or lost them & having driven ashore on the Rocks on Great Cranberry Island in the terrible gale of the 17th. Inst being appointed on a survey of said vessel and Cargo you are hereby required to go onboard and alongside of said ship or vessel & Cargo and particularly Examine the situation of said vessel & cargo and make your report under Oath accordingly

Dated at Cranberry Isles this 18th. day of January 1867 William P Preble Notary Public



PROTEST OF CAPTAIN THOMAS H SMALLIDGE OF THE SCHOONER PILOT OF MT DESERT ENTERED AT CRANBERRY ISLES THE OCT 25th 1867

By this Public Instrument of Protest of Thomas H Smallidge Master of the Schr. Pilot that on the 25 day of Oct 1867 before me William P Preble a Notary of Public duly commissioned personally appeared & came before me Thomas H Smallidge Master of the ship or vessel called the Pilot of the burthen of 44 /100 (sic) tons or thereabouts belonging to the Port of Mt Desert and Elisha G Young of Eden Mate of the said ship or vessel and James W Rice a passanger on board of said vessel who severally declared that the said ship or vessel being laden with merchandize they the said appearers set sail on board the said ship or vessel from Boston in the State of Massachusetts bound directly to the Port of Mt Desert in the State of Maine at 10 0 Clock A M on the 22nd. day of October last past with the wind at South and the said ship in the prosecution of her voyage on the night of the 22nd. the wind hauled to the N N West with rain squalls at about 10 0 Clock the wind continuing to breeze fresh from the N N West we steered our course by the wind until we made Seguin light bearing East by North at 2 0 Clock in the morning of the 23rd. the wind continuing N N West we steered along the coast until about Eleven 0 Clock we were abrest of White Head light at the West Entrance of the Muscle Ridges we stood along by the wind under single reefed foresail & Main Sail & jib and met several vessels coming through the Muscle Ridges with a free wind and also the Steamer M Martin we continued to sail along by the wind until we were abrest of Spruce Head so called we continued to sail along by the wind and we saw a Schooner steering direct for us bound to the South West and as soon as she came within hailing distance we hailed him repeatedly and requested him to keep off it then being about half past Eleven 0 Clock in the forenoon fearing he would run into us we continued to hail him and made all the noise we could and requested him to keep off but he did not and steered straight for us we could see no watch on her deck and they took no notice of us until they were within once of the length of the vessel from us we then saw one man on deck and up to that time we could not see anyone at the helm of the Schooner we continued to make all the noise we could until we found she would run into us we then ran foreward for the safety of our lives and the Schr. Struck us on the Starboard quarter about six feet from the Taffrail breaking off three top timbers splitting water ways breaking the rail and taking off the waste clean to the main Transom horn timbers stern (?) and all on that side stove and boat etc (?) and her Jib Boom went through our main sail tearing it badly until the Jib Boom broke which let her clear of us we then saw the Schr. hailed from Addison she went into Seal Harbor and came to anchor and we came to anchor where we were and commenced to clear the wreck and see what situation the vessel was in we found her as before represented and had the vessel have been deeply laden would have Sunk and after clearing up the wreck we got under way and went into Seal Harbor and anchored alongside of the Schr. that run into us which proved to be the Schr Brilliant of Addison

We then went to work and put temporary repairs on the Pilot so that we could proceed to our Port of destination with due caution the rest of the passage being on the Inland route where we arrived in safety on the morning of the 25th. of October at 4 0 Clock and the said appearers did further severally declare that the said ship or vessel at the time of her departure from Boston upon the said intended voyage was tight staunch & Strong and her hatches was well and sufficiently secured and covered and was well and sufficiently manned provided and furnished with all things needful and necessary for the said intended Voyage and that during the said voyage the appearers and ships company used their utmost endeavors to preserve the Ship and the goods of her lading from damage and therefore the said Thomas H. Smallage (sic) did declare and protest as by these presents he does solemnly protest against all and every person or persons whom it shall or may concern and does declare that all damages losses and detriments that have happened to the said Ship are and ought to be borne by Captains and the owners of the said Schr Brilliant and Merchants interested or whomsoever else it shall or may concern the same having occured as before mentioned and not by or through the insufficiency of the said Ship or Schr Pilot or neglect of the said appearers his officers or any of his Mariners

All of which Acts are hereby duly declared and set forth
Signed Thomas H. Smallage (sic) Master
Elisha Y. Young Mate
James W. Rice Passenger

Hancock S S

Personally appeared Thomas Smallidge master Elesha (sic) Young mate & James W Rice passenger on board of the said Schr or vessel called the Pilot being severally duly Sworn do severally make oath & say that the instrument of protest hereunto annexed has been clearly and distinctly read over to them these deponents and that the several matters and things therein contained are right and true in all respects as the same are therein particularly alledged declared and set forth

Sworn to before me William P Preble a Notary of Public & Justice of the Peace & Quorum at Cranberry Isles the 25th. day of October 1867

To George E. Haynes Rufus King Shipmasters and William Spurling Shipwright residents of the town of Tremont in the County of Hancock and State of Maine At the Instance and request of Thomas H. Smallage (sic), Master of the Schr Pilot of Mt. Desert on a voyage from Boston to Mt. Desert having been run into By Schr Brilliant of Addison in the Muscle Ridges on said passage or voyage on the twenty third Inst and having sustained considerable damage to the vessels Hull Boat Main Sail Main Boom etc And being thereby appointed on a survey of said vessel you are hereby required to go on board and alongside of said Schr. and particularly examine the said vessel and the damages she has sustained and make your report under Oath accordingly

Dated at Cranberry Isles this 25. day of October 1867 William P Preble Notary Public

Hancock S S

October 25th. 1867 Personally appeared the above named george E. Haynes Rufus King & William Spurling and made Oath that they would faithfully and impartially perform the duties assigned them by the above warrant before me

Daniel Somes, Justice of the Peace

$228.00

Persuant to the above warrant we the undersigned chosen to view and assess the damages sustained by the Schr Pilot of Mt Desert run into on the 23rd Inst by the Schr Brilliant of Addison do hereby report that we have viewed the damage sustained by the Schr Pilot and do value and adjudge the damage thereby occasioned to the said Schr Pilot as follows as follows to wit. to the Hull the sum of two hundred & Ten Dollars to the Boat the sum of Five Dollars to the Mainsail the sum of Ten Dollars and to the Mainboom the sum of three Dollars

Hancock S S

Personally appeared the undersigned George E. Haynes Rufus King & Win. Spurling and made Oath to the above Bill Before me on the 26. day of October 1867

B.T. Atherton, Justice of the Peace

George E. haynes
Rufus King Appraisers
Win. Spurling



PROTEST OF CAPTAIN BENJAMIN T. CARTER OF THE
BRITISH BRIGANTINE CHARLOTTE OF ST. JOHNS


by this Public Instrument of Protest made and Entered this 4th, day of Nov. A.D. 1867 by Capt. Benjamin T. Carter Master of the British Brigantine Charlotte of St. John N.B. Before me William P. Preble a Notary of Public at Cranberry Isles, Personally appeared Benj amine T. Carter Master of the said ship or vessel called the Charlotte of the Burthen of One Hundred & Sixty Tons British Measurement or thereabouts belonging to the Port of St. John N.B. and Alfred Bennet first mate of the said Ship or Vessel and Charles W. Cole a passenger on board of said vessel and being Laden with Blocks of Free Stone and at 2 Oclock P.M. of Thursday Oct. 31st. got under weigh at Hopewell N.B. and proceeded to sea bound to New York in the United States with the wind from N.N.W. with a fresh breeze at half past 11 P.M. Reefed Mainsail furled the outer Jib fine weather Nov. 1st. At 6 A.M. passed Partridge Island Light with moderate breeze from the North 3 P.M. Libby Island Light one mile dist. Bearing North Saturday light winds from S.S.W. at 1 A.M. Moosepeck Light bore N.W. by W. 12 Miles Distant at 2 A.M. wind increasing and hauling westerly with cloudy weather at 4 A.M. tacked ship and stood by the wind to the North and Westerly at 6 A.M. blowing fresh at 8 A.M. wind moderated at l2 M. very moderate wind W.S.W. looking like a storm tried to get into Cranberry Island Harbor at 3 P.M. we were up with Bakers Island with the wind hauling West and Northerly at 5 P.M. Cleared away our Starboard Anchor and overhauled a range of Chain at 6 P.M. we were caught aback with a very heavy Squall from the N.W. let down all light sails lowered down Mainsail swung round and got her off before the wind and furled all light Sails Singled Reefed the Mainsail and set it hauled her by the wind and tacked ship wind fresh from the N.W. Stood along by the wind intending to go to Cranberry Island Harbor it blowing very fresh at 10 P.M. had to square away and run East to get the sail off the vessel Sunday this day comes in with fresh Gales from W.N.W. at 1 Oclock A.M. furled all our sails but foresail and set it and hove her too (sic) heading to the S.W. the sea was very rough Shipped a sea and shifted chain and Carried away gangway steps at 2 A.M. Vessel laboring very gale increasing with a very heavy sea but more regular vessel laying better but roling heavily and leaking some at 7 A.M. took a pull at her Back Stays to save the Spars at 10 A.M. moderated at 12 M. took an Observation found our Latitude 43.52 at 2 P.M. Still moderating at 3 P.M. made sail at 4 P.M. Light Breeze from W.N.W. and clear 5 P.M. increasing wind and looking like a storm from the South at 6 P.M. wind hauling West and Southerly the weather looking very bad bore up for Mt. Desert at 11 P.M. made Mt. Desert Rock Light bearing N.W. wind increasing at midnight of the 3rd. of Nov wind increasing from the South Nov. 4th. fresh wind from the South and very cloudy at 2 A.M. was up with Mt. Desert Rock Light wind South and blowing a gale with rain at ½ past 2 A.M. took in Main Sail and made Bakers Island Light bearing N by W Distant 8 miles at 3 A.M. lost sight of the Light bearing N.W. by W. 4 miles in a rain squall and blowing very fresh at half past three smoothened the water to a small extent caught a glimmer of the Light bearing W. by South half a mile distant we steered N. by W. ½ W. expecting to bring out Bear Island Light but it being very thick and dark with rain and blowing a perfect Gale of wind and not making Bear Island Light and fearing to run any further to Leeward we hauled up N.W. by N. and made the land in about 10 minutes judging it to be half of a mile off at 4 A.M. made Breakers right ahead hard up our helm to keep her off and immediately she paid off and struck on a sunken Ledge her stern swinging onto the ledge and she stuck fast and pounded very heavy until the tide ebbed and she lay still we being uncertain of our Position cleared away the Boat and awaited a chance to leave the vessel at half past four Oclock and the vessel was full of water and at daylight found ourselves too far South by one fourth of a mile. We soon saw men on shore ready to render assistance if necessary at 10 A.M. Gale increasing at 12 M. moderated. At 3 P.M. succeeded in leaving the vessel in Safety with all hands and went on board Brig Ida Cutter and which went into Cranberry Island Harbor and came to anchor where we found several vessels had harbored

Benjamin T. Carter Master
Alfred Bennett Mate
C.W. Cole Passenger

And the said appearers did further severally declare that the said Ship at the time of her departure from Hopewell N.B. aforesaid upon the said intended voyage was tight staunch and strong and had her Hatches well and sufficiently caulked and covered and was well and sufficiently Manned provided and furnished with all things needful and necessary for the said intended voyage and that during the said voyage the Appearers and Ships Company used their utmost Endeavors to preserve the said ship and the goods of her Lading from damage and therefore the said Benjamin T. Carter did declare and protest as by these presents he does solemnly protest against all and every person or persons whom it shall or may concern and does declare that all damages losses and detriments that have happened to the said ship and the goods of her Lading are and ought to be borne by the Merchants and Freighters interested or whomsoever else it shall or may concern the same having occured as before mentioned and not by or through the insufficiency of the said ship or neglect of the said appearers his officers or any of his mariners All of which acts are duly declared and set forth

Benjamin T. Carter Master

Alfre Bennett Mate

hancock S.S.

Personally Appeared Benjamin T. Carter Master & Alfred Bennett First Mate of the Brigantine Charlotte of Saint John New Brunswick and Charles W. Cole Passenger on board of the said vessel being severally duly sworn do severally make Oath and say that the Instrument of Protest hereunto Annexed has been clearly and distinctly read over to them these deponents and that the several matters and things therein contained are right and true in all respects as the same are therein particularly alledged declared and set forth

Sworn to before me William P. Preble A Notary of Public at Cranberry Isles. A Justice of the Peace and Quorum this 7th. day of November A.D. 1867




PROTEST OF CAPT LEWIS H BRACY OF THE C E HOWARD OF CRANBERRY ISLES COUNTY OF HANCOCK & STATE OF MAINE

By this Public Instrument of Protest made & Entered this 23rd. day of June A.D. 1868 by Lewis H Bracy Master of Schr. or Boat C E Howard of Cranberry Isles

Before me William P Preble a Notary of Public at Cranberry Isles personally appeared Lewis H Bracy Master of the said ship or vessel called the C E Howard of the Burthen of Twelve Tons or thereabouts N.U. (?) belonging to the port of Cranberry Isles in the County of Hancock and State of Maine U.S.A. and Benjamin Spurling Mate of the said ship or vessel being laden with assorted Merchandize at 11 Oclock in the forenoon of the 21st. day of June last past we set sail from Bangor bound direct to the port of Cranberry Isles both in the State of Maine and proceeded down the River with the wind from the North East and misty weather we continued to sail until about 5 Oclock in the afternoon it being thick & rainy at that time come to anchor at Fort point we laid there until the morning of the 22 and at about six Oclock got under way with the wind at North East and a fair breeze and we continued our course down the Bay and about 10 Oclock A.M. passed Cape Roseaway (sic) at the Entrance of Eagea— mavoggin (sic) Reach the wind canting Easterly and moderate hauled by the wind and beat into the passage the weather rainy & foggy we work her down the reach and at about 4 Oclock in the afternoon we passed Hog Island on the North side of it and continued to work down the passage and about 7 Oclock P.M. it moderated down and was nearly calm and we lay becalmed and drifting with the tide about an hour at about 8 Oclock in the evening it was foggy & rainy we had a Squall with the wind from the E N East it then shut down thick again we stood by the wind to the South & East until we judged ourselves nearly across the Bay and was talking of going in stays were both of us on Deck one steering and the other forward looking our best could not discern or hear anything the first we knew she Struck a sunken rock and slid clear of it hardly stopping her head way which we suppose must have been Boy Ledge which lays one half to three fourths of a mile from shore we went in stays and stood to the Northward and tried the pump found we could not free her we saw Bass Harbor light as the fog lifted on our weather bow looked down in the Cabin and found the water was six inches over the Cabin floor continued to pump and run the vessel for Bass Harbor and as near as we could judge for about 20 minutes we found she was filling had to let her come too to keep her from rolling over we hauled up our boat and got into her fearing she would sink as she was nearly deck to the water at that time we got clear of her in the boat and in a few minutes she sunk stern first carrying all down with her Except the Compass which we saved we laid by in the Boat as near as we could judge for one hour and it lighted up again and we saw the light again and it moderated down and the fog lifted up and we started and rowed for the light intending to land but it cleared up and we Kept along & after rowing through the night at daylight in the morning and being exposed to the weather from the time the vessel sunk in a small skiff arrived safe at Cranberry Island

And the said appearers did further severally declare that the said ship or vessel at the time of her departure from Bangor aforesaid upon her said intended voyage was tight staunch and strong and had her hatches sufficiently covered and was well and sufficiently manned provided and furnished with all things needful and necessary for the said intended voyage and that during the said voyage the said appearers used their utmost Endeavors to preserve the said vessel and the goods of her loading from damage and therefore the said Lewis H Bracy did declare and protest and by these presents does solemnly protest against all and Every person whom it shall or may concern and does declare that all damages & losses and detriments that have happened to the said ship and the goods of her loading are and ought to be borne by the merchants & freighters & underrighters or whomsoever else it does or may concern the same having occured as before mentioned and not by or through the insufficiency of the said vessel or neglect of the said appear— ers of the said vessel or neglect of the said appearers

All of which acts are hereby duly declared & set forth

Signed Lewis H Bracy Master
Benjamin Spurling Mate

Hancock S S Personally appeared Lewis H Bracy Master and Benjamin Spurling Mate of the said ship or vessel called the C E Howard being severally and duly sworn make oath & say that the Instrument of Protest hereunto annexed has been clearly and distinctly read over to them these deponents and that the several matters and things therein contained are right & true in all respects as the same are herein alledged and set forth

Sworn to before me William P Preble a Notary of Public at Cranberry Isles the 23rd. of June A.D. 1868



PROTEST OF CAPT GEORGE McNEALY OF THE BRITISH SCHR AMARANTH OF DIGBY NOVA SCOTIA

Entered at Cranberry Isles the 26th. day of Oct. A.D. 1868

By this public Instrument of Protest of Capt George McNealy Master of the Schr. Amaranth that on the 26th. day of Oct 1868 before me William P Preble a Notary of Public duly commissioned personally appeared and came before me George McNealy Master of the ship or vessel called the Amaranth of burthen of 99 tons or thereabouts British measurement belonging to the Port of Digby N Scotia and Richard Armstrong Mate of the said ship or vessel who severally declared that they the said appearers on the 24th. day of Oct last past they set sail on board of said ship from Gloucester Harbor in the State of Massachusetts U.S.A. bound direct to Cornwallis Nova Scotia with the wind from the westward and clear weather and that the said ship in the Prosecution of her said voyage while sailing along the coast on the night of the 24 at 10 OClock it come up cloudy and the wind from the South went with a heavy sea heading from the South at 3 OClock on the morning of the 25th. vessel rolling heavy parted the Lee Main Sheet and Jibed the main sail broke the main boom and split the main sail called all hands and Stowed it and also stove the galley we then sailed along under the head sails and at daylight commenced work to fish the main boom and repair the Main Sail which we done as well as we could and at 10 0 clock set the Mainsail wind light from the westward fearing the main boom would not stand and wanting twine hauled too intending to go into Mt Desert at about 4 0 Clock in the afternoon of the 25th. it being then moderate sailed towards Mt Desert and at half past six 0 clock passed Long Island intending to go into South West Harbor continued our course along and at half past seven Oclock in the Evening made breakers right ahead & under our lee hauled too and saw rocks under our lee and she immediately struck on the western side of Long Ledge and stuck fast it being then about high water and we heeled her on shore at about the time was leaving her (sic) she fell over off shore and we thought it would take the spars out of her and at daylight on the morning of the 26th. commenced to strip off the sails and rigging for the benefit of the parties interested the weather looking very bad with all the appearances of an Easterly Gale I then Noted a Protest and called a Survey on the vessel who recommended an immediate sale for the benefit of whom it does or may concern and they the said appearers did further severally declare that the said ship at the time of her departure from Gloucester aforesaid upon the said intended voyage was tight staunch and strong and had her hatches well and sufficiently secured and was well and sufficiently manned provided and furnished with all things needful and necessary for the said intended voyage and that during the said voyage the appearers and ships company used their utmost Endeavors to preserve the said ship from damage and therefore the said George M Nealy did declare and protest as by these presents he does solemnly protest against all and every person or persons whom it shall or may concern and does declare that all damages losses or detriments that have happened to the said ship are and ought to be borne by the Owners Merchants and Freighters interested or whomsoever Else it shall or may concern the same having occured as before mentioned and not by or through the insufficiency of the said vessel or neglect of the said appearers or any his (sic) crew all of which acts are hereby duly declared and set forth

Signed George McNealy Master
Richard Armstrong Mate

hancock S S

personally appeared George McNealy Master and Richard Armstrong Mate of the said ship or vessel called the Amaranth being severally and duly Sworn make Oath and say that the Instrument of Protest hereunto annexed having been clearly and distinctly read over to them these deponents and that the several matters and things therein contained are right and true in all respects as the same are therein particularly alleged declared and set forth Sworn to before me at Cranberry Isles Oct 26th. A.D. 1868 Wm. P Preble Notary Public



PROTEST OF CAPTAIN ALEXANDER THOMAS
OF THE BRITISH BRIGANTINE AEROLITE OF ST. JOHNS N. BRUNSWICK


Hancock S S

By this Public Instrument of Protest made and Entered this 13th. day of Jan A D 1869 by Alexander Thomas of the Brigantine Aerolite of St Johns New Brunswick

Before me William P Preble a Notary of Public at Cranberry Isles County of Hancock & State of Maine Personally appeared Alexander Thomas Master of the said ship or vessel called the Aerolite of the burthen of one hundred and fifty tons british measurement or thereabouts belonging to the Port of St. Johns in the Province of New Brunswick and John kenneday Mate of the said ship or vessel being laden with ballast at Nantasket Roads in the State of Massachusetts U.S.A. on Sabbath morning of the 10th. day of Jan at 7 0 Clock in the morning set sail with a light breeze from the W S West bound direct to the Port of St Johns in the Province of New Brunswick at about 10 0 Clock A M the wind veered to the Northwest with a fresh Breeze and clear weather at 12 0 Clock Thatchers Island Lights bore N N West at 2 P M Thatchers Island Light House bore W by North distance about 10 miles from which I took my departure with a fresh breeze furled our Gaft (sic) Topsail upper Staysail and Flying Jib at 6 (?) P M took 2 reefs in our main sail and set it furled our topgallant sail and single reefed the fore topsail hauled down the middle staysail and furled it and took in and furled the inner jib the wind continuing from the North West we steered our course to the North East at 10 0 Clock in the Evening we made Monhegon light bearing N E by North with a heavy Chop from the West N West which made the vessel labor heavily at 12 0 Clock Monhegon light bore N by West about 10 miles distant wind canting to the North and blowing fresh with cloudy weather Ship making an East by North course at 2 0 Clock A M we made Matinicus Rock lights bearing North East by East or one point on our weather bow at 4 0 Clock A M of the 11th. inst. Matinicus Rock lights bore N by West wind moderating set our middle Staysail and inner jib the wind checking to the N N East the ship making an East by South course at 8 0 Clock A M made Mt Desert hills bearing N by East wind dying away and canting Easterly made all Sail and Stood by the wind to the Southward and Eastward with our Larboard Tacks (?) aboard and nearly calm at 12 Meridian tacked ship and stood to the North and Easterly with baffling winds and snow spits with all the appearance of a snow storm and Gale of wind at 2 P M made Mount Desert Rock Lighthouse bearing North at 4 P M Mt Desert Rock bore West 2 miles distant we continued our course by the wind intending to make a harbor if Possible for the preservation of Life and property we continued our course by the wind until we made Bakers Island Light bearing North by West we continued along by the wind until Bakers Island Light bore West by North the weather at the time thickening up and Snow Squalls with the wind at East by South and had every appearance of a Gale and blowing fresh we Kept off North West to open the inlet to Cranberry Island harbor and then began to take in sail hauled up foresail down Flying Jib and middle Staysail over overhauled a range of chain on the sheet anchor and from the appearances of the Land at intervals judged ourselves well over towards the mountains still running our course North West opened a passage into Cranberry Island harbor we kept off west North west to Enter the passage with a good lookout forward Saw Bakers Island light about 2 points on our larboard bow with squalls of mist and Snow wind increasing vessel going about 7 knots the first thing we knew we brought up all standing on the Rocks at about 8 0 clock in the Evening wind increasing to a Gale hauled down the mainsail kept the Topsail and main Staysail on her we then hauled down the jib she then hove round her head partially off shore we then set the Main Sail in hopes to force her off shore but to no avail we then hauled it down and furled it we then rounded in the larboard braces and backed the topsail in hopes to back her off shore but to no avail the vessel rolling and beating heavily on the rocks and the Sea increasing with the gale we then laid the topsail square to the gale for the preservation of our lives and to save the property if possible at 10 OClock blowing a perfect gale with the wind Snow hale and sleet and freezing as it struck vessel beating up the rocks as the tide flowed at high water she had beat up so far on the rocks that she lay still and as the tide left her she grounded laying lengthwise off the ledge with her keel in a crevise in the ledge and sat nearly upright and at about half past three 0 Clock in the morning of the 12th. the tide had left the Brig we then prepared to abandon her for the preservation of our lives we got our boat off deck and our clothing on the ledge at that time saw a light coming which proved to be the light house Keeper and warned us of our situation and told us it would be but a few minutes before the tide would be up over the bar and we must leave immediately if at all We then let go the sheet anchor and left and he conducted us across the bar through the surf as the tide was flowing fast and a tremendous sea throughing (sic) in and when we got to the house we found the Mate and Second mate missing at daylight saw they were upon the wreck having lost their way over the bar and got back on board of the Brig the sea making a complete breach over her and the vessel pounding fearfully at about 11 0 Clock she rolled down on her beam Ends with her masts in the water and her topsides beating on the Bar and at high water beat over the anchor checking but her head to the wind she drifted on to a reef and the anchor and chain put her up the Mate & second mate all this time lashed to the weather main rigging at 3 0 Clock in the afternoon succeeded in getting a Boat off the shore to go to their relief and they succeeded in rescuing them and brought them safe to shore it being impossible to get a boat off before at the time of leaving the vessel we hauled up the Boat on the Nubble with our clothing etc. in her and lost her with the most of our Effects feeling grateful for the preservation of our lives the wind had then hauled to the North East and moderated and at daylight on the morning of the 13th. found men at work trying to save property from the (wreck) I went along side and found it to be the wreck masters crew I then told them to save all the property they could as her hull was awfully beat to pieces and her topsides on one side principally gone concluded it was useless and unwise to call a Survey on her

Signed Alexander Thomas Master
John Kenneday Mate

And the said appearers did further severally declare that the said ship at the time of her departure from Nantasket Roads upon the said intended voyage was tight staunch and strong and had her hatches properly covered and was well and sufficiently manned provided and furnished with all things needful and necessary for the said intended voyage and that during the said intended voyage the appearers and ships company used their utmost Endeavors to preserve the said ship and the goods of her lading from damage and therefore the said Alexander Thomas did declare and Protest as by these presents he does solemnly Protest against all every person or persons whom it shall or may concern and does declare that all damages and detriments that have happened to the said ship and the goods of her lading are and ought to be borne by the Owners Merchants and Freighters interested or Whomsoever Else it shall or may concern the same having occured as before mentioned and not by or through the insufficiency of the said ship or neglect of the said appearers his officers or any of his Mariners All of which acts are hereby duly declared and set forth

Signed Alexander Thomas Master
John Kenneday Mate

Hancock S S

Personally appeared Alexander Thomas Master and John Kenneday Mate of the ship or vessel called the Aerolite being severally & duly sworn make oath & say that the Instrument of Protest hereunto annexed has been clearly and distinctly read over to them these deponents and that the several matters and things therein contained are right and true in all respects as the same are therein particularly declared alleged and set forth

Sworn to before me

William P Preble a Notary
of Public at Cranberry Isles the 18th.
day of January A.D. 1869



PROTEST OF CAPT. MANNING LENT OF BR, BRIGANTINE
EDWARD DELISLE OF BASTERRE ST. CHRISTOPHERS ISLAND B.W.I.


Hancock S S
By this Public Instrument of Protest made and entered this 23rd. day of April A.D. 1869 By Capt Manning Lent of the Br. Brigantine Edward Delisle of St Christophers Island B.W.I. Before me Wm. P. Preble Notary of Public duly commisioned at Cranberry Isles County of Hancock State of Maine Personally appeared Manning Lent Master of the said Ship or Vessel called the Edward Delisle of the Burthen of one Hundred and Seventy tons or thereabouts British Measurement belonging to the Port of Basterre St Christophers Island B.W. Indies and Joseph L. McNeil Mate of the said Ship or Vessel being laden with ballast they the said appearers set sail from Boston in the State of Mass. U.S.A. on Sunday the 18th. inst at 3 Oclock in the afternoon with the wind at W.N.W. bound to the Port of Port Medway in the Province of N. Scotia we sailed along the coast with a light Breeze and fine weather at 12 Oclock at night Tatchers Island bore N. six miles dist with a light Southerly & Easterly breeze and hazy with the appearance of fog the wind continued light and baffling and canting easterly. At 12 Oclock at noon on Monday the 19th. tacked Ship to the southerd and eastward with a thick fog and light winds we stood by the wind until 4 P.M. we then tacked ship and stood by the wind to the N. & Westerly until 8 P.M. the fog lighted up and we made Wood Island light ship heading N. by W. at 9 P.M. tacked ship and stood by the wind to the South & Eastward at 10 P.M. made Cape Elizabeth lights bearing N.N.E. about 10 miles dist the weather thickening up with rain we stood by the wind to the Southard & Eastward the wind baffling until 8 A.M. of Tuesday the 20th. inst tacked Ship and stood to the N & Eastward with thick weather and the wind breezing up strong from the East at 12 M tack Ship and stood to the South & East until 4 P.M. wind hauling to the Southwest and breezing up strong with rain and fog tacked ship and stood to the eastward steered our course E. by N. by Compass at 12 Oclock Midnight wind canting to the South and blowing fresh with Squalls of rain and thick fog we continued our course B. by N. Vessel going seven knots by Log and very thick fog and rainy Squally weather at 3 Oclock A.M. of the 21st. we made breakers right ahead we put our helm down and she immediately Struck on the rocks with a very heavy sea on which Stove our Boat and broke the rudder the vessel roled on the rocks for a few minutes fell off shore broke down and immediately filled the sea washing completely over her with no possible means of getting ashore it being flood tide as the tide arose the wreck beat up the shore and swung round stern on shore and at 11 A.M. the tide had ebbed and we succeeded in getting ashore and were thankful for the preservation of our lives We then found we were on Great Duck Island on which one man resided who took us to his house who did what he could for our relief it being very rough and blowing fresh could not do anything to save property and on thursday the 22nd. two boats came from one of the neighboring Islands it moderating and the wind hauling to the W.N.W. and cleared off we went to work to save what we could as the Vessel was a complete wreck and on friday the 23rd. people came on the Island from different places. Concluded it would be useless and a needless expense to call a Survey Considered it was best to sell the wreck and materials saved for the benefit of all parties interested

Signed Manning Lent Master
Joseph McNeil Mate

And the said appearers did further severally declare that the said ship at the time of her departure from Boston upon the said intended Voyage was tight Staunch and strong and had her hatches properly covered and was well and sufficiently manned provided and furnished with allthings needful and necessary for the said intended Voyage and that during the said intended Voyage the appearers and ships company used their utmost endeavors to preserve the said ship and the goods of her Lading from damage and therefore the said Manning Lent did declare and protest as by these presents he does solemnly Protest against all and every person or persons whom it shall or may concern and does declare that all damages losses and detriments that have happened to the said Ship and the goods of her lading are and ought to be borne by the owners Merchants and freighters interested or whomsoever it shall or may concern the same having occured as before mentioned and not by or through the insufficiency of the said ship or the neglect of the said appearers his officers or mariners

All of which acts are hereby duly declared and set forth

Signed Manning Lent, Master
Joseph L. McNeil Mate

HANCOCK S S

Personally appeared Manning Lent Master and Joseph L. McNeil Mate of the said ship or Vessel called the Edward Delisle being severally and duly sworn make oath and say that the instrument of Protest hereunto annexed has been clearly and distinctly read over to them these deponents and that these several matters and things therein contained are right and true in all respects as the same are therein particularly declared alleged and set forth
Sworn to before me
Win. P. Preble Notary Public at Cranberry
Isles this 23rd. day of April A.D. 1869



PROTEST OF CAPT. WM. LIPSETT OF THE BRITISH SCHR. ROSILLA B. OF ST. JOHNS N.B.

Hancock S S

By this Public Instrument of Protest made & Entered this tenth day of February A.D. 1871 by William Lipsett of Schr Rosilla B of St Johns new Brunswick

Before me William P Preble a Notary of Public at Cranberry Isles County of Hancock & State of Maine Personally appeared W. Lipsett Master of the ship or vessel called the Rosilla B of the Burthen of One hundred & seven tons British measurement or thereabouts belonging to the Port of St John in the Province of New Brunswick and William Heater Mate of the said ship or vessel being laden with Flour & Shorts (?) or fine feed at Portland in the State of Maine U S America on Friday at about 7 Oclock in the evening of the third day of February A D 1871 Set sail with the wind at South West and a good breeze and clear weather bound direct to the port of St John at eleven Oclock in the Evening had a very heavy squall from the North West the Flying Jib being stowed and the Main Sail two reefed took in the foresail and furled it the squall struck so sudden that it jibed over our main boom carrying away our Main sheet and breaking the boom at the jaws We immediately took in the main sail and close reefed the Foresail & set it and run the vessel to the North East under a close reefed foresail & main Jib at 5 Oclock on the morning of the 4th. broke the main Jib Boom and took the head off the jib had to take it in & furled it as well as we could it being iced up badly and the vessel covered with Ice we stood along to the Eastward until 11 Oclock in the forenoon Kept off South East to clear Matinicus Rock it blowing a perfect Gale horrid cold and a very thick vapor could see but a short distance we hauled her too by the wind as near as she would lay with that sail and in a few minutes split the foresail we then as a last resort tied down the Jaws of the Main Gaff and set the peak of our mainsail and let her drift and tried to get the foresail in but it was so iced up could not get it in at 5 Oclock on Sunday morning it being the 5th. a Sea Struck our Boat & took her away from the davits vessel tight and strong we drifted under the Peak of the mainsail until monday the 6th. in the meantime the Ice had carried away the Jumper Stay and we were covered with Ice ten inches thick over our hatches it then moderated and we commenced to clear the Ice off and fish the main boom at about 10 Oclock in the forenoon set Flying Jib and wore ship & stood to the North West set three reefed mainsail & trimmed it with the watch (?) Tackle it being very rough & almost impossible to do anything on Tuesday 7th. moderate wind hauling to the N.E. sent down our Gaft topsails finished fishing main boom set the mainsail bent one of the Topsails for a Jib & set it then bent the other for a foresail & stood to the Northward the wind hauling to the Southard & Eastward & very light baffling airs & calm Wednesday at 10 Oclock A.M. spoke the Schr Annie E 40 miles to the Southard & Eastward of Mt Desert Rock with very moderate and light wind from the S East at 2 OClock in the afternoon it began to threaten foul weather & soon after had spits of Snow and Snow Squalls At 7 OClock in the Evening made a light & at (?) OClock in the Evening was close to Mt Desert Rock bearing west of us wind S East & Breezing and thick of Snow we stood to the North about 8 miles the wind increasing took in sail and hove her too it being very thick of Snow the vessel heading South by West at 2 OClock in the morning of Thursday the 9th. had a glin and saw land called all hands to make sail but found we were right on the shore tried tried the vessel for stays and she missed we then let go both anchors and brot her up rode (?) her until 4 0 Clock in the morning the wind & sea increasing she began to kedge her anchors and Struck aft and we supposed parted one of the chains and immediately commenced pounding and dragging the other she brought up aft carrying away the rudder & Stern Post and pounding very heavily on the rocks swung round & bilged and filled with water we then swung our main boom on shore over a high Crag in the rocks and one of the men let himself down by a line and after a hard struggle in the water succeeded in getting ashore and afterwards we got a line ashore being thankful for the preservation of our lives we then saw a house and went to it and found it to be on Great Duck Island where the inhabitants treated us kindly and done all in their power to make us comfortable and after getting warm and our clothes dried went to the wreck and found it breaking up and fearing as the tide came in it would go to sea Sold the wreck for 50$ but on the tide flowing it beat up on the rocks with a prospect of saving some of the cargo and on Friday morning it being moderate with a westerly wind set what men I could get to work to save Cargo & went to Cranberry Island to get help in a small boat it breezed up fresh in the afternoon and no chance to get back Early Saturday went to the wreck and called a Survey and on the report of the Survey offered to sell the cargo at Public Sale and the bids not being satisfactory withdrew the sale we then set the men at work to save Cargo and saved about 300 bbls of Flour badly damaged which was all there was that would pay the Expenses the broken and damaged bbls sold at Public Auction and also the Shorts and fine feed as it lay scattered the balance having washed away and become lost

And the said appearers did further severally declare that the said ship at the time of her departure from Portland upon the said intended voyage was tight Staunch & Strong and had her hatches properly covered and was well and sufficiently manned provided and furnished with all things needful and necessary for the said intended voyage the appearers and ships company used their utmost endeavors to preserve the said Ship and the goods of her lading from Damage and therefore the said Wm. Lipsett did declare and protest as by these presents he does solemnly Protest against all and Every person or persons whom it shall or may concern and does declare that all damages losses and detriments that have happened to the said ship and the goods of her lading are and ought to be borne by the Owners merchants and freighters interested or whomsoever Else it shall or may concern the same having occured as before mentioned & not by or through the insufficiency of the said ship or neglect of the said appearers his officers or any of his mariners

All of which acts are hereby duly declared and set forth Signed at Cranberry Isles Maine this 13th. day of feb A D 1871

William Lipseet (sic)
William Heates (sic)

Hancock S S

To Lewis H H Bracy and Joseph Harding Shipmasters and Henry S Bunker all residents of Cranberry Isles in the County of Hancock & State of Maine at the request & instance of William Lipsett Master of the ship or vessel called the Rosilla B of St Johns N Brunswick bound from the port of Portland in the State of Maine U S America having been driven ashore on Great Duck Island in said State of Maine and Stranded on the 9th. day of Feb 1871 in a thick snow Storm you are hereby appointed a Survey to go on board of said wreck & alongside and also to Examine the Cargo saved and carry up out of the tides way & particularly Examine the Situation of said Cargo and make your report under oath accordingly

Dated at Cranberry Isles this 11th. day of Feb 1871 Win. P Preble Noty Public

Personally appeared the above named Lewis H Bracy & Joseph Harding Shipmasters & Henry S Bunker Shipwright and were duly sworn to faithfully and impartially perform the duties assigned them by virtue of this warrant before
William P Preble Justice Peace
Cranberry Isles
Feb 11 1871

Pursuent to the above warrant we the undersigned chosen to repair to the wreck of the Schr Rosilla B & Examine the situation of the Cargo on board & alongside & on the beach saved from the wreck do hereby report that we went on board & alongside and particularly Examined the Cargo as it was situated and recommend that it be immediately sold at Public auction for the benefit of whom it does or may concern
Cranberry Isles                                  L H Bracy
Feb 13th. 1871                      Signed Joseph Harding
                                                         Henry S Bunker



PROTEST OF CAPT. SAM'L COLE OF THE SCHR. WM. HONE OF STATEN ISLAND, NEW YORK

By this public instrument of protest made and entered this 9th. day of Dec. A.D. 1872 by Saml Cole Master of Schr Wm. Hone of Staten Island N.Y. before me Wm. P. Preble a notary of Public of Cranberry Isles, personally appeared Sam. Cole Master of the Said Ship or vessel called the Wm. Hone of the burthen of 99 tons or thereabouts belonging to the port of Staten Island in the State of New York and Andrew Small Mate of the said Ship or vessel being laden with Lumber and bound for the Port of Calais in the State of Maine, and bound to Boston Mass. U.S.A. Set sail from Calais on Saturday Nov. 30th. 1872 at 12 Oclock at Noon wind W S W good breeze and sailed along down the river to the Ledge so called, came to anchor and laid there until 9 oclock on Sunday the first day of Dec. got under weigh with the wind west and sailed down the bay to Lubec anchorage ground, with a number of other vessels wind being ahead to go to sea and laid there until Wednesday the 4th. day of Dec. at 9 oclock in the morning the tide being right and the wind N. West proceeded on our said intended voyage and sailed up the Coast as far as Little River Head we then took the wind westerly blowing fresh sea making tacked ship with other vessels and made Cutler Harbor came to anchor furled our sails at 5 oclock in the afternoon and laid there until Saturday morning the 7th. day of Dec. at 6 oclock in the morning the wind N.W. and clear weather got under weigh, and proceeded to Sea. at 10 Oclock a good breeze we continued our course up the shore as far as Mooseabec Red Head so called bearing N.W. by N. the wind canting westerly and heading us off Stood off Shore by the wind until 12 oclock at Noon. Stayed ship and stood on shore heading up N.W. at 2 Oclock in the afternoon Stayed ship and stood off shore by the wind about half an hour wind baffling and canting Southerly. Stayed ship and stood on shore Petit Manan bearing N.W. We steared along by the wind until half past three oclock in the afternoon tacked ship and stood off shore very moderate breeze until Six oclock in the evening the wind canting southerly tacked ship and stood on shore until 7 Oclock tacked ship and stood off shore wind baffling clouding up vessel heading S.W. by W. wind canting Northerly at 8 oclock in the evening nearly calm wind canting Southwesterly Stood along by the wind until 10 Oclock tacked ship and stood on shore by the wind heading up west wind hauling west wind hauling (to) the South and Eastward we steered W.S.W. until 10 minutes of three Oclock in the morning the weather being thick and hazy. Bakers Island Light bearing N.E. one and one half miles by judgement we made Bass Harbor Head Light bearing W. by N. We steered along W. by N. until 20 minutes past three oclock the Mate steering the Capt at the lookout forward. Made breakers on the Lea bow sung out to wheelsman hard a lea and she immediately struck on a sunken Ledge and beat up further on the ledge. Finding we could not possibly get her off and for the safety of our lives were compelled to abandon her as the sea was running high and making fast it was with difficulty we got clear of the wreck. We then proceeded in toward the shore at Tremont S.W.H. and landed at ½ past four oclock in the morning finding the vessel to be ashore on Bunkers Ledge so called immediately procured help and a vessel and proceeded to the wreck to save property if possible the wind canting to the eastward blowing fresh and very rough impossible to land lay by until low water. one boat at the risk of their lives succeeded in landing and furled the sails with double stops. took from her the flying jib payed the chains and anchors overboard fearing on the rise of the tide she would go to pieces, and abandoned her and went ashore. at three oclock in the afternoon started in the vessel again for the wreck but it was so rough found it impossible to get near her. cargo washing off and Vessel breaking up at half past four the sea hove the wreck stern to the west and in a few minutes she washed clear of the ledge and drifted ashore on the beach at S.W. Harbor, Dolivers Cove so called. Vessel completely broken up Cargo Strewn along shore in a broken and damaged condition.

And the said appearers did further severally declare that the said ship or vessel at the time of her departure from Calais aforesaid upon the said intended voyage was tight staunch and strong and had her hatches sufficiently covered and was well and sufficiently manned provided and furnished with all things needful and necessary for the said intended voyage and that during the said (voyage the) appearers used their utmost endeavors to preserve the said ship and the goods of her lading from damage.

And therefore the Said Saml Cole did declare and protest, and by these presents does solemnly protest against all and every person whom it shall or may concern and declares all damages losses and detriments that have happened to the said ship on the goods of her lading are and ought to be borne by the Merchants and freighters and underwriters or whomsoever else it shall or may concern the same having occured as before mentioned and not by or through the insufficiency of the said vessel or neglect of the said appearers.

All of which acts are hereby duly declared and set forth

Signed Samuel Cole Master
Andrew Small Mate

Hancock S.S.

Personally appeared Samuel Cole Master and Andrew Small Mate of the said ship or vessel called the Win. Hone being severally and duly sworn make oath and say that the instrument of Protest hereunto annexed has been clearly and distinctly read over to them these deponents and that several matters and things therein contained are right and true in all respects. as the same are therein particularly declared alleged and set forth.

Sworn to Before me
Wm. P. Preble Notary Public at Tremont
this 9th. day of Dec. A.D. 1872



PROTEST OF CAPT. JAMES B. HEAD OF SCHR. G.F. BAIRD OF ST. JOHNS NEW BRUNSWICK

By this public Instrument of Protest made and entered this 2nd. day of Dec A.D. 1874 by James B Head Master of the Schr or vessel called the G F Baird of St Johns New Brunswick Before me william P Preble a Notary of Public of Cranberry Isles in the County of Hancock & State of Maine personally appeared James B Head Master of the said ship or vessel called the G F Baird of the burthen of 94 Tons or thereabouts belonging to the Port of St Johns in the Province of New Brunswick & Albert Landon Mate of the said ship or vessel being laden with Lumber and bound from the Port of St Johns N B to the Port of Boston Mass U.S.A.

Set sail from the Port of St Johns on Wednesday the 26th. day of Nov 1874 at 9 Oclock A M wind N N West at 11 Oclock Partridges Island bore N by East 2 miles distant 12 M wind N West light at 2 P M wind N N West light at 4 P M Point Lepreu (?) & bore N by West wind continuing N N W pumps well attended at B P M the Northern Head of Grand Manan bore south wind N N West light at 12 midnight wind North light 27th. fine 2 A M light wind from North 4 A M wind North & lighter 10 A M wind N East a light Breeze at 12 M wind S West a strong breeze 2 P N bore up for Mooseapeck harbor and came to anchor about 3 P Wand furled our sails Saturday 28th. fine weather laid in the harbor wind South West Sunday 29th. still in harbor blowing a gale both anchors ahead and a severe rain storm Monday 30th. still laying in MooseaPeck harbor fine weather clear and cold wind N West Tuesday Dec 1st. fine weather at 6 A M wind N North West Strong breeze got under way and proceded to sea stearing a West course along the shore wind moderating 10 A M wind light from N N East 12 M wind S by East air light at 2 P N wind S S East light at 4 P N wind South strong breeze at 6 P M breeze continued with all appearances of a storm of snow Steering our course by Compass W S West with spits of snow and to all appearances threatening a Snow Storm sea making and being on a lea shore at 8 0 Clock P M bore up for Cranberry Island Harbor and it immediately shut down thick of snow steering N West for the passage it being very thick and blowing a gale from the S S East keeping a good lookout ahead at 9 0 Clock P M made the breakers on our Port bow hard up the helm to clear the breakers and she Struck it being so thick that we could not see the shore hauled down the sails and furled them and dropped the anchors under foot to keep from driving up on the shore wind and sea increasing thumping heavily on the rocks parted the sheet chain as we supposed her bows then swung round towards the shore continuing to pound very heavily at 3 A M tide flowing and driving up on the rocks broke the rudder and commenced leaking at 4 A N full of water it being very rough on Wednesday 2nd. vessel still lay on the rocks too rough to move anything Thursday 3rd. continues rough blowing fresh from South West after part of day S S West and appearances of a fog & Storm vessel laying in a position that we could not save Cargo kept a watch to keep all things strait at 6 oclock P M of the 4th. wind west and overcast 8 0 clock P N wind North 10 oClock N N East and continued through the night at times blowing fresh and on the morning of the 4th. a fresh breeze at N N East when the tide went down all hands appeared at the vessel to save Cargo and vessel if possible the prospect was unfavorable to start anything on Acct of the weather

I called a Survey on the vessel & Cargo and they recommended that we should not start anything until a proper chance to raft the Deck load for the safety of vessel & Cargo & for the benefit of whom it does or may concern

And they the said appearers did further severally declare that the said ship at the time of her departure from St Johns aforesaid upon the said intended voyage was tight staunch & Strong and had her hatches well and sufficiently secured and was well and sufficiently manned provided and furnished for the said intended (voyage) with all things needful & necessary for the said intended voyage and that during the said voyage the appearers and ships company used their utmost Endeavors to preserve the said ship and the goods of her lading from damage and therefore the said James B Head did declare and protest as by these presents he does solemnly protest against all and Every person or persons whom it shall or may concern and does declare that all damages losses or detriments that have happened to the said vessel and the goods of her lading are and ought to be borne by the owners merchants and freighters interested or whomsoever Else it does or may concern that the same having occured as before mentioned and not by or through the insufficiency of the Said vessel or neglect of the said appearers or any of his crew all of which acts we hereby duly declared and set forth

Signed James B Head Master
Albert Landon Mate

To Joseph Harding & Edwin Bunker Shipmasters & Samuel C. Stover shipwrights all residents of the Town of Cranberry Isles in the County of Hancock & State of Maine at the instance & request of James B Head Master of the Schr or vessel called the G F Baird of St Johns New Brunswick and bound for the Port of Boston in the State of Massachusetts U.S.A. having gone ashore on Bar Point so called on little Cranberry Island on the 1st. day of Dec A D 1874 in a thick snow storm as a Survey on said vessel & Cargo you are hereby required to go on board & along side of the said Schr and particularly Examine the said vessel and Cargo and make your report under oath accordingly

Dated at Cranberry Isles this 3rd. day of Dec A D 1874 William P Preble Notary Public

Cranberry Isles Dec 3rd. 1874

We the undersigned having been appointed on a Survey of the British Schr G.F. Baird of St Johns N B all residents of Cranberry Isles in the County of Hancock & State of Maine deposeth & say and hereby jointly & severally declare and attest to all whom it does or may concern that on the 3rd. day of Dec 1874 at the instance & request (of) Capt James B Head Master of the Schr G.F. Baird of St Johns N B hereby certify that we went on board and along side of the said Schr and found her on the rocks at Bar Point on Little Cranberry Island and found her Keel gone to the garboards and about 5 feet of the lower part of the stern post gone and about 5 feet of her garboard gone on the starboard side & plank badly chafed and on her port side under the fore chains there was a rock that appears to go through her plank the Deck aft around the rudder Post broken up and gone and her anchors were let go off shore the sheet chain appears to be broken and one anchor stock gone & on said Examination of vessel & Cargo recommended not to move anything from said vessel until it becomes a smooth chance to raft the Deck load and save the vessel if possible

In Testimony whereof we hereby Subscribe our Names at Cranberry Isles this 4th. day of Dec A D 1874

on our Oaths
Joseph Harding
Edwin H Bunker
Samuel C Stover



THE STATE OF MAINE

Hancock S S

Cranberry Isles Dec 7th. 1874

Capt James Greene Master of the Schooner Henry Bushman of Parsboro Nova Scotia has this day noted a Protest of disaster to his said vessel on account of being ashore near Bakers Island bar in the Town of Cranberry Isles and fearing damage to his vessel on account of said disaster has this day Entered his Protest and after lightening about two tons of Coal on the flood tide vessel floated off without any apparent damage as she made no water of account in a few minutes the Pumps Sucked and continues tight

Before me

William P Preble Notary Public



STATE OF MAINE HANCOCK S S

Hancock S S   14th. 1875

Burnard McConnell Master of the Brig Three Cheers of Halifax in the Province of Nova Scotia and bound on a voyage from Ponce Puerto Rico West Indies to St Johns New Brunswick has this day noted this his protest having struck his vessel on a rock while coming into the western passage for a harbor weather looking bad a storm threatening and being short of water & fearing damage to his vessel and as there is no chance to dry her here to examine her bottom enters this his Protest to be extended at pleasure if necessary

Dated at Cranberry Isles
April 14th. 1875
Before me
William P Preble Notary Public



SURVEY AS APPOINTED ON THE SCHR OLIVE CLARK

To Tyler H Stanley ship Carpenter & George Gilley and Gilbert T Hadlock ship masters and residents of Cranberry Isles in the County of Hancock & State of Maine at the request of Capt James Davis Master of the ship or vessel called the Olive Clark of Eastport and bound on a voyage from Eastport in the State of Maine to Boston in the State of Massachusetts having got his vessel ashore on Little Cranberry Island on the 17th. day of March A D 1876 at 3 0 Clock in the morning in a thick snow storm You are hereby appointed as a survey to go on board and alongside of said vessel and Examine said vessel and Cargo and make a report of the condition of said vessel & Cargo under Oath

Dated at Cranberry Isles this 17th. day of March A D 1876

William P Preble Notary Public

Cranberry Isles March 17th. 1876
To William P Preble Esq Notary Public

this certifies that we have been on board & alongside of the wrecked Schr Olive Clark now on the Bar in the Town of Cranberry Isles & find her in a very dangerous position with a hole in her bottom and her bottom in general very badly damaged and we think will go to pieces before tomorrow morning as its getting to be very rough and the wind blowing fresh from the East we also find the Cargo wet & damaged in the hold with the Exception of a few boxes of smoked herring on the upper side as she lay heeled over to starboard Dated at Cranberry Isles this 17th. day of March A D 1876

Tyler H Stanley
George E Gilley
Gilbert T Hadlock Surveyers of the wrecked Schr Olive Clark

We would further report

March 18th. 1876 Nine Oclock A M at the wreck of Schr Olive Clark we find her broken up masts & standing rigging alongside and on the beach Cargo mostly gone adrift we recommend the saving of all that can be saved this low water for the benefit of whom it does or may concern

Tyler H Stanley
George E Gilley
Gilbert T hadlock

Protest of Capt James E Davis Master of the Schr Olive Clark of Eastport on a voyage from Eastport in the State of Maine and bound to Boston in the State of Mass U.S.A. Entered at Cranberry Isles this 17th. day of March A D 1876 before me Wm P Preble a Notary of Public for the County of Hancock in the State of Maine

By this public instrument of Protest made & Entered the day & year above written by Capt James E Davis of the Schr Olive Clark deposeth & says that on March 16th. at 3 0 Clock P M got under way at Eastport & sailed on our voyage for Boston wind North & fair under single reefed sails with our vessel in good order & Staunch & Strong with our hatches properly secured for the voyage and steered the proper course through Lubec narrows thence steered our course West by South until we were abrest of Little River at 9 P M weather clear wind moderating shook out the reefs & put all sails on the vessel heading West by South ½ South for Moose a Peck at 11 Oclock passed Moose a Peck at 11 Oclock passed Moose a Peck light we then stood west for petitmenan wind East & cloudy going about six knots per hour at one Oclock in the morning petitmenan bore North it commenced snowing and at 2 Oclock A M shut down thick of snow wind increasing to a stiff breeze steering our course along the coast west half south it being very thick & blowing fresh & threatening a gale all hands on the lookout for Bakers Island Light intending to go into South West Harbor (Mt Desert) the wind canting Southerly & useless to think of getting to sea at half past 3 Oclock made the light hauled up North West and immediately made the breakers on our port bow & at the same time she struck aft hove the wheel up immediately and she swung into the breakers and on hung the rudder started the stern post and filled with water and for the safety of our lives cut away the Boat and got her clear of the stern & had to abandon the vessel as the tide was running and the sea increasing left the vessel & rowed along the shore and at 5 Oclock in the morning we sighted a light rowed to it and found it was on board a vessel in Cranberry Island Harbor we went on board & warmed ourselves and then landed on Little Cranberry Island & Started in pursuit of our vessel we fell in with Mr Hadlock and he went with us as a guide over to Capt Gilleys on the south side of the Island & he launched his boat and went with us to the wreck the tide was then leaving her and we found her bilged and her stern post started and keel also started Cargo wet & damaged put on a crew to save Cargo for the benefit of whom it might concern we then called a Survey & noted a protest and continued to save property from the wreck it continuing to blow a gale and Expecting the vessel would go to pieces we continued to work until the sea drove us from the wreck on the flood tide and had to abandon the wreck until the next day at 9 Oclock in the morning were at the wreck and found her broken in pieces with her masts and rigging alongside and on the beach Cargo mostly gone adrift we continued to search the shore & saved all in our power

And the said appearers did further severally declare that the said ship of vessel at the time of her departure was tight Staunch & Strong on the said intended voyage and had her hatches well and sufficiently secured and was well & sufficiently manned provided and furnished for the said intended voyage and that during the said voyage the appearers & crew used their utmost Endeavors to preserve the said ship and the goods of her lading from damage & therefore the said James E Davis did declare & Protest as by these presents he does solemnly declare & Protest against all and every person or persons whom it does or may concern and does declare that all losses damages detriments that have happened to the said vessel & the goods of her lading are & ought to be borne by the owners merchants & freighters interested or whomsoever else it does or may concern that the same having occured as before mentioned and not by or through the insufficiency of the said vessel or neglect of the said appearers or any of his crew all of which acts are hereby duly declared & set forth

Signed
James E Davis Master
Elijah M West Mate

Hancock S S Cranberry Isles March 29th 1876

Personally appeared James E Davis Master & Elijah M West Mate of the said ship or vessel called the Olive Clark being severally & duly sworn make oath & say that the instrument of Protest hereunto annexed has been duly & distinctly read over to them these deponents & that the several matters therein contained are right & true in all respects as the same are therein particularly declared alleged and set forth

Sworn to before me at Cranberry Isles

William P Preble a Notary of Public for
County of Hancock



State of Maine Hancock S S

PROTEST OF CAPT ALONZO YOUNG OF SCHR REDONDO OF ELLSWORTH IN THE SAID STATE & COUNTY

By this Public instrument of protest made & entered this 27th. day of April A D 1876 by Alonzo Young Master of the ship or Schr Redondo of Ellsworth Before me William P Preble a Notary of Public at Cranberry Isles personally appeared Alonzo Young Master of the said Schr Redondo of the burthen of 98 Tons or thereabouts N M belonging to the Port of Ellsworth in the County of Hancock & State of Maine and Abijah Curtis mate of said ship or vessel being laden with cement bb (?) staves and having set sail from Hancock in the State of Maine and bound to Flatbush in the state of New York U.S.A. on the 26th. day of April 1876 at 11 oclock in the A M sailed on our said intended voyage with the wind from East by North and steered our course down the river & into the bay with a good breeze and continued our course down the bay had the 2 jibs set foresail & reefed mainsail tried the pumps 100 clips (?) & then a suck continued to try the pumps & found but little water in the vessel and would get a rolling suck the wind breezing up & quite rough sea as we opened out by Schr Head vessel labering heavily and sea making steered our course across the passage towards Bakers Island and when we got within 3 miles of Bakers Island found the vessel was very tender sided dropping her main boom and deck load into the water wind increasing vessel rolling fearfully and pitching by the Head pump continually going Mate at the pump Captain Steering found the vessel had sprung a leak and was filling with water fearing she would roll over if we passed out by Bakers Island selected a smooth place to run her ashore for the safety of our lives and the goods of her lading keep off and run the vessel onto bakers Island bar and it so happened that we selected a good place sounded the pump & found 4 feet of water in the hold it blowing a very fresh breeze with snow squalls and all appearance of a gale of wind and a severe snow storm this happened at half past 2 oclock in the afternoon of the 26th. day of April and on the same day of our sailing from Hancock haul down our jibs & mainsail & furled them kept the foresail up to Keep the vessel steady and heal her on shore and when the tide was down carried out the anchors to keep the vessel from driving over the bar & going to sea hoping to save property by so doing we then left the vessel we then went to the houses being wet & cold the Inhabitants received us Cordially & administered to our wants

And the said appearers did further declare that the said ship or vessel at the time of her departure from Hancock aforesaid was tight staunch & strong and had her hatches well & sufficiently secured and was well & sufficiently manned provided & furnished with all things necessary for the said intended voyage & that during the said intended voyage the said appearers & ships crew used their utmost Endeavors to preserve the said ship & the goods of her lading from damage & therefore the said Alonzo Young did declare & Protest and by these presents does Solemnly Protest against all & every person whom it shall or may concern and does declare that all damages losses & detriments that have happened to the said vessel & the goods of her lading are & ought to be borne by the merchants freighters & underwrighters or whomsoever

—Else it does or may concern the same having occured as before mentioned and not by or through the insufficiency of the said vessel or the neglect of the said appearers or any of his crew

Alonzo Young Master
Abijah Curtis Mate

Hancock S S

Personally appeared Alonzo Young Master and Abijah Mate of the said Schr or vessel called the Redondo being severally and duly Sworn make oath & say that this Instrument of Protest hereunto annexed has been clearly & distinctly read over to them these deponents and that the several matters & things therein contained are right & true in all respects as the same are therein particularly alleged & Set forth

Sworn to before me William P Preble a Notary of Public at Cranberry Isles the day of May A D 1876



PROTEST OF CAPT HENRY S BUNKER OF THE SCHR SUNBEAM OF CALAIS STATE OF MAINE U.S.A.

Hancock S S By this public instrument of Protest made & Entered at Cranberry Isles this 28th. day of June A D 18/b Before me William P Preble a Notary of Public in the County of Hancock & State of Maine personally appeared Henry S Bunker Master of the ship or vessel called the Sunbeam of the burthen of One hundred & Eighteen tons N M or thereabouts belonging to the Port of Calais in the State of Maine & Joseph Willard Bunker Mate of the said ship or vessel being laden with laths at Calais in the State of Maine Set sail for Alexandria in the State of Virginia U.S.A. at 9 0 Clock A M of June 20 A D 1876 Towed down from Calais to what is called the Ledge and then made sail with the wind from the South & foggy and beat down as far as Red Beach and came to anchor about 3 0 clock in the afternoon & on the 21st. got under way at 3 P M wind still from South and beat down to Gleasons Cove and came to anchor at 6 P M and on the 22nd. wind came off from the westward got under way at 10 A M at 12 noon passed through the Lubec Narrows wind canting to the South west and clear we sailed along the coast and on the 23rd day of the month came to anchor at Cranberry Isles at 6 P M it being calm it continued calm and Flattering until the 26th. at 2 P M the wind breezed up from the westward got under way & proceeded to Sea and stood off by the wind until 7 Oclock of the morning of the 27th. wind canting to the South tacked ship and stood to the west south west by the wind at noon the fog shut down very thick we still stood along by the wind heading up South west by west still thick and going about 5 knots and at half past 4 0 Clock in the afternoon was run into by a fishing schooner name unknown & hailing from Gloucester Standing to the Eastward by the wind Striking the Sunbeam on the Starboard Quarter and cutting her down below the waters Edge we immediately wove round and run our vessel before the wind to keep her from filling and all hands commenced to throw off the Deck load to lighten the vessel and keep her from filling with water we saw the other vessel before she struck us and hailed her a number of times they took no notice of us and we could see no one on her deck but the man at the helm and he was sitting down and to all appearances asleep and after throwing away the larger portion of our deck load healing the vessel to Port (to keep her from filling) Examined her and found it was necessary for the safety of the vessel & the balance of the Cargo to get her into Port as soon as the circumstances would admit we then steered our course for Long Island head at about 5 0 Clock P M running under our foresail until the morning of the 28th made sail it was still very thick of fog and going at the rate of 4 knots continued to run towards the Land and at 12 0 Clock at noon of the 28th made a boat and sent the Boat to it and it proved to be Johns Island and the vessel was in what is termed Johns Island passage we then run over for Long Island and made it we then set our course for Cranberry Island and run for it intending to harbor as it was very thick of fog and not safe to continue at Sea we stood our course along until half past 4 0 Clock in the afternoon made breakers right ahead put the wheel hard to Starboard and as she swung too she run upon the Ledge and brot up all standing and run out 2 feet forward it was then about high water and she healed over to port and was fast upon the Rocks which proved to be what is called Rices point or the South west Point of Great Cranberry Island I then went for to get assistance in hopes of getting her afloat the next tide carried out an anchor the length of our halsed (sic) and hove taught but she did not float as the tide did not come high Enough by 3 feet consequently could not move her the vessel thumped heavily and commenced to leak did not disturb the Cargo as it was too Expensive to get it over the rocks where it would be safe & in hopes to get her off but on the morning of the 30 finding that she was making water fast and the prospect unfavorable to get her off had to abandon the Idea and procured a vessel to take the Cargo to a place of Safety

And they the said appearers did further severally declare that the said ship at the time of her departure from Calais aforesaid on the said intended voyage was tight staunch & strong and had her hatches well & Sufficiently secured and was well and sufficiently manned Provided and furnished with all things necessary for the said intended voyage the appearers and ships company used their utmost endeavors to preserve the said ship and the goods of her lading from damage and therefore the said Henry S Bunker did declare and Protest and by these presents he does solemnly Protest against all and Every person whom it shall or may concern & does declare that all damages losses and detriments that have happened to the said vessel and the goods of her lading are and ought to be borne by the owners Merchants & Freighters interested or whomsoever Else it does or may concern that the same having occured as before mentioned and not by or through the insufficiency of the said vessel or neglect of the said appearers or any of his crew all of which acts are hereby duly declared & set forth

Signed henry S Bunker Master
Joseph W Bunker Mate

Hancock S S Personally appeared Henry S Bunker Master and Joseph W Bunker Mate of the said ship or vessel called the Sunbeam being severally and duely Sworn make oath and say that the instrument of Protest hereunto annexed has been clearly & distinctly read over to them these deponents and that the several matters therein contained are right and true in all respects as the same are therein particularly alleged set forth and declared

Sworn to before me this 1st day of
July A D 1876
William P Preble Notary Public

Survey as appointed on Schr Sunbeam

To Theodore M bunker of Mt Desert and George H Spurling of Cranberry Isles Shipmasters and Leonard Holmes Esq shipwright of Cranberry Isles aforesaid in the county of Hancock & State of Maine at the request & instance of Henry S Bunker Master of the ship or vessel called the Sunbeam of Calais in the State of Maine and bound on a voyage from Calais to Alexandria in the State of Virginia U.S.A. having gone ashore on Rices point so called being the South west Point of Great Cranberry Island on the 28th of June last in a thick fog and as Survey on the said vessel & you are hereby required to go on board and alongside of said vessel and particularly Examine the said vessel and Cargo and make your report of the situation she is in under oath accordingly

Dated at Cranberry Isles this 7th day
of July A D 1876
William P Preble Notary Public

hancock S S

Personally appeared Theodore M Bunker & George H Spurling ship masters & Leonard Holmes shipwright and were duely Sworn to faithfully & impartially perform the duties assigned them by virtue of this warrant

At Cranberry Isles this 7th day of July 1876

Before me

William P Preble Justice of the Peace

hancock S S

By virtue of the aforesaid & accompanying warrants we went alongside of the Sunbeam and found her heeled over on the Port side and laying very hard on the Rocks could not see the Port side as she lay on it but it appeared to be bilged her keel was badly broken her fore foot gone a part of the shoe gone and her starboard side was badly strained and the vessel was badly crooked (sic) up and appeared as though her back was broken as she hung by the middle and crooked over the Ledge also went on board and found her port bilge badly broken in & her staunchions had sagged over to Port side her knees on the Port side broken in the throats and also on the Starboard side and her top appeared to be shifted over to Port her butts outside all Started and her waterways on Deck all started and badly strained and we are of the opinion that in the situation the Schr is in that it would be for the interest of the Parties interested to sell her at Public Sale for the benefit of whom or may concern as the Expenses of floating the vessel off would be heavy and should a storm come while in the situation the vessel is in she must go to pieces

We further find on the Starboard quarter that the vessel had been run into and cut down through the top sides and two streaks of the plank cut through and the corner of the house taken off and started the whole stern of the vessel to the port side and badly strained the whole quarter of the vessel and we hereby assess the damages received by the collision at Five hundred dollars

Signed T M Bunker
G H Spurling
L Holmes

And we further recommend that the balance of the Cargo found on board at the time of Sale of the vessel be sold at public auction for the benefit of whom it does or may concern

Signed T M Bunker
G H Spurling
Leonard Holmes



PROTEST OF CAPT JOSEPH BUNKER MASTER OF SCHR BAKER OF ROCKLAND

... on a voyage from Bangor in the State of Maine for Boston in the State of Massachusetts U.S.A. Entered at Cranberry Isles this 7th. day of Nov A D 1878 before me Win. P Preble a Notary of Public for the County of Hancock in the State of Maine

by this Public instrument of Protest made & Entered the day and year above written by Capt Joseph Bunker of the Schr Baker of Rockland State of Me of the burthen of 47 tons N M or thereabouts deposeth & says that on the 3rd. day of Nov last set sail from Bangor at 3 0 Clock in the afternoon with the wind at west north west with a decent little breeze and fair weather under single reefed sails fore and aft and proceeded down the river and about six oclock in the afternoon came to an anchor at nine oclock lay there that night and until 2 0 Clock in the afternoon & the wind being a head until that time when it hauled to the North West got under way and proceeded on our said voyage down the river during the after part light snow squalls carrying single reefed foresail vessel being very crank & leaking slightly and at 8 0 Clock in the evening of monday came to anchor off Fort Point and lay there until about 8 oclock in the morning of Tuesday the 5th. got under way and proceeded down the Bay carrying light sail single reefed foresail & jib with the wind at west north west with a good breeze and continued our course down the Bay until half past nine 0 Clock when near down to Turtle head took a severe squall from west north west with snow took in the jib to keep the vessel from blowing over kept off before the wind vessel laboring heavily with a cross chop of a sea commenced leaking settled down the foresail and scud her before the wind finding it impossible to keep her above the water commenced to heave off the deck load of Lumber for the safety of our lives and Cargo of our lading and by Estimation threw off of the deck crew from four to five thousand of Lumber and at that time being near Cape Roseaway (sic) had to haul too to obtain the Entrance to Edge de mavoggin (sic) reach it being smooth water and near Eleven 0 Clock in the forenoon swayed up the foresail and proceeded down the reach and at 1 0 Clock in the afternoon came to anchor in what is called Sargents Cove and laid until 7 1/2 0 Clock Wednesday morning the wind being ahead to proceed on our voyage got under way with the wind at west and fair weather proceeded down the reach and at 1 Oclock arrived at Cranberry Isles safe and without further loss or damage to vessel or Cargo

and they the said appearers did further severally declare that the said ship or vessel at the time of her departure from Bangor was tight staunch & strong on her said intended voyage and had her Hatches well and sufficiently secured and was well and sufficiently manned provided and furnished for the Said intended voyage and that during the said voyage the appearers and crew used their utmost Endeavors to preserve the said ship and the goods of her lading from damage and therefore the said Joseph Bunker did declare & protest as by these presents he does solemnly declare & Protest against all & Every person or persons whomsoever it does or may concern and does declare that all losses damages and detriments that have happened to the said vessel & the goods of her lading are & ought to be borne by the owners merchants & Freighters interested or whomsoever else it does or may concern that the same having occured as before mentioned and not by or through the insufficiency of the said vessel or the neglect of the said appearers or any of his crew all of which acts are hereby duely declared & set forth

Signed

Joseph Bunker Master
Robert Stanwood Mate

Hancock S S Cranberry Isles Nov 7th. 1878

Personally appeared Joseph Bunker Master & Robert Stanwood Mate of the said ship or vessel called the Baker being severally and duely sworn make oath & say that the instrument of Protest hereunto annexed has been clearly & distinctly read over to them these deponents & that the several matters therein contained are right & true in all respects as the same are therein particularly declared alleged & set forth

William P Preble Noty Public



PROTEST OF CAPTAIN CHARLES BISHOP OF THE SCHR
OR VESSEL CALLED THE LYRA OF WINDSOR NOVA SCOTIA


Hancock S S By this Public instrument of Protest made & Entered at Cranberry Island this 2nd. day of Dec A D 1878 Before me William P Preble a Notary of Public in the County of Hancock & State of Maine Personally appeared Charles Bishop Master of the ship or vessel called the Lyra of the burthen of Sixty two Tons or thereabouts belonging to the Port of Windsor and Thomas Thomas Mate of the said ship or vessel being laden with Potatoes at the Port of Alma in the province of New Brunswick at or about 4 0 Clock in the afternoon set sail on a voyage to New York U S A of Nov 17th. proceeded along the coast until the 22nd. day of Nov made a harbor at Head Harbor Mooseapeak and laid there with stormy weather & head winds until the 1st. day of Dec set sail with the wind at North at 4 0 clock in the morning on our said intended voyage and steered our course along the shore until 12 oclock at noon the wind flattened away and became calm and continued calm until 4 0 Clock in the afternoon breezes up with light airs from the south & west Bakers Island bearing west about 8 miles distant by judgement we trimmed our sails by the wind and sailed along with light airs and hardly steerage way on the vessel at 10 0 Clock in the Evening wind breezing up tacked ship and stood off shore vessel heading up about south by east to S S East at 11 oclock wind breezing and canting southerly with clear weather tacked ship and stood to the westward vessel going about 3 knots with a strong flood tide against us and finding we could not get by Bakers Island to the west side of it at half past one in the morning of Dec 2nd. clouding up & looking stormy concluded it was best to keep the vessel off and run into South West Harbor Bakers Island Light bearing due west one mile distant steered our course North to open the passage into S W Harbor carrying our mainsail on the Port side and after passing in by Bakers Island and near up to Cranberry Island a back flow of wind took our mainsail and jibed it over all standing which caused the vessel to come too hove up the helm immediately to keep her off and the wheel rope parted & before we could get her off before the wind or on her course she struck on a sunken ledge near the Eastern side of Little Cranberry Island let go our anchor immediately and tried to swing her head off shore it being flood tide but found the vessel was fast to the bottom and filling with water lowered down the sails and put stops on them the vessel lurching heavily and filling with water left her and rowed ashore to seek shelter from the weather the sea increasing it being about 4 0 Clock in the morning and near high tide the wind S East and all appearances of a storm and a fresh blow

and they the said appearers did severally declare that the said ship at the time of her departure from the Port of Alma aforesaid was tight staunch & Strong and had her hatches well & sufficiently secured and was well and sufficiently manned provided and furnished with all things necessary for the said intended voyage the appearers & ships company used their utmost Endeavors to preserve the ship and the goods of her lading from damage and therefore the said Charles Bishop did declare & Protest and by these presents he does solemnly protest against all and every person whom it shall or may concern & does declare that all damages losses and detriments that have happened to the said vessel and the goods of her lading are and ought to be borne by the Owners Merchants & Freighters interested or whomsoever else it does or may concern that the same having occured as before mentioned and not by or through the insufficiency of the said vessel or neglect of the said appearers or any of his crew all of which acts are hereby duely declared & set forth

Signed Charles Bishop Master
Thomas Thomas Mate

Hancock S S

Personally appeared Charles Bishop Master and Thomas Thomas Mate of the said ship or vessel called the Lyra being severally and duely sworn make oath & say that the instrument of protest hereunto annexed has been clearly and distinctly read over to them these deponents and that the several matters therein contained are right and true in all respects as the same are therein particularly declared & set forth

Sworn to before me this sixth day of Dec A D 1878 at Cranberry Isles

Wm. P Preble Noty Public

Copy of the report of Survey
Cranberry Isles Dec 3rd. 1878

This certifies that we the subscribers as called upon as a survey on the wrecked Schr Lyra of Windsor N S now ashore on little Cranberry Island have Examined said Schr and find her a total wreck with stern gone and deck gone and the hull broken into and we do condemn said vessel and recommend that the Cargo along the shore be sold at once and the sails and riggin (sic) be taken off and put out of the tides way



PROTEST OF CAPT LUTHER COLBETH OF

Schr Presto of Machias having got his vessel ashore on Black Ledge one of the gut ledges in the Town of Cranberry Isles and fearing damage to the said vessel and loss of Cargo hereby enters this his Protest said vessel belonging to the Port of Machias laden with pine Lumber & Ceder Post and Bound from the Port of Machias State of Maine to the Port of Boston in the State of Massachusetts Enters this his Protest to be Extended at pleasure if necessary

Cranberry Isles
Nov 4th. 1878 Luther Colbeth

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